Green News

Watching your waste

Posted by Environment Smart on 10/30 at 01:32 PM
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I recently read a news story out of the U.K. about a group of women who were trying to shed the pounds from their waste, not their waist. They were apparently involved in an innovative scheme to help women cut their food waste and shopping bills in half. The idea was to use "simple, old-fashioned home economics". 

The National Federation of Women's Institutes teamed up with the Waste & Resources Action Programme (Wrap), the Government's packaging waste agency, to create 10 "Love Food" groups. These groups teach women how to "waste less, be more efficient cooks and to cut shopping bills – with the aim of reducing the 6.7 million tons of food the UK wastes every year".

"We throw away a third of the food we buy in the UK, so to cut back that waste by 50 per cent is outstanding," said Julia Falcon, a campaign manager for Wrap. "We can see that groups who decide to share their experiences with each other, and tackle this problem together, work extremely well."

In this case, the women organised groups in 10 UK towns. With a grass-roots approach, they held monthly meetings where they discussed food storage, shopping, meal planning and preservation. It sounds much like a home-economics course, but the results were impressive. According to the article, "their households reduced waste from an average 4.7kg (10.4lbs) a week to 2.2kg (4.9lbs) a week".

The projects really highlights the environmental impact of food waste. According to Wrap's estimations, the UK's food waste generates "18 tons of carbon dioxide a year – the same as a fifth of the cars on the road. Much of the food thrown out ends up in landfill, where it emits methane, a damaging greenhouse gas".

I was intrigued by the results of the Women's Institute's initiative and wanted to learn more about WRAP's lovefoodhatewaste campaign. I found that the website is loaded with excellent tips on reducing your grocery bill, keeping your food fresh longer, time saving, recipes, food storage, measuring portions, and much more. It is well worth a bookmark!

 

 

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